Sunday, 30 December 2018

KILLER KIDS MOVIES - CULT CINEMA

Bypass the zombies & vampires because nothing is scarier then a psychotic child. 
This month Cult filmmaker Fabrizio Federico picks his favourites from the disturbing genre:
























Saturday, 1 December 2018

CHAMPIONS OF THE UNDERGROUND *CINEMA SPOTLIGHT* Teddy Bears Live Forever (2019) Dir: Fabrizio Federico


A glimpse into the aftermath of ''It girl'' culture. April an ex-celebrity 'youthquaker' who at the absolute zenith of her career has a total nervous breakdown in 4D millennial Hollywood. The non-stop intense excitement, flashes, games, disciples, and bad vibrations all came at once to her door.

TEDDY BEARS LIVE FOREVER (2019) 
Dir: Fabrizio Federico

WATCH HERE - OFFICIAL WEBSITE
JANUARY 1ST, 2019

INSPIRED BY THE LIVES OF MARILYN MONROE, KURT COBAIN & JUDY GARLAND





Wednesday, 28 November 2018

IAN CURTIS GRAVE, VISITED BY FILMMAKER FABRIZIO FEDERICO

IAN CURTIS GRAVE


IAN CURTIS GRAVE

IAN CURTIS GRAVE
IAN CURTIS GRAVE


Thursday, 22 November 2018

JONAS MEKAS - THE GODFATHER OF UNDERGROUND CINEMA


Jonas Mekas, the filmmaker often referred to as the ‘godfather of the avant-garde’, who pioneered the diary-film through his intensely personal works such as Walden (1969) and Lost Lost Lost (1976) and a new generation of young, eager artists came along for the ride.

His focus was on diary filmmaking, a style of personalised cinema in which actual events in the life of the filmmaker are documented in a quasi-documentary mode, but are more openly subjective and impressionistic, more poetic.
New York-based Lithuanian Jonas Mekas is the leading exponent of this cinematic form 
to create a poetic record of moments in people's own lives, and of their families, while learning how to shoot on 16mm film using a Bolex H16, the camera used by Jonas for nearly 40 years. The Bolex is a camera renowned for its myriad functions, enabling multiple creative possibilities for shooting spontaneous effects in-camera.

Mekas is an integral figure in the history of what used to be called underground cinema, not just as a film-maker, but as a writer, a curator and a catalyst.
His career is peppered with the names of the more famous people he worked with in the golden age of avant-garde film-making in the 1960s, from Yoko Ono to Jackie Kennedy, Allen Ginsberg and the Beats to the Warhol set. Many of these figures ended up in his films, which have in turn influenced the likes of Jim Jarmusch, Harmony Korine, John Waters and Mike Figgis, along with influencing new filmmakers such as l'enfant terrible Fabrizio Federico, ''His films are like a breath of fresh air, he just goes along with the flow, records life as it is and isnt interested in being stressed out by commercial success, he's his own cinema planet, I identify completely with his relaxed poetic attitude to cinema.''

Mekas also befriended the Velvet Underground, allowing them to rehearse in his loft and filming their famous gig at the New York Society for Clinical Psychiatry. Legend has it that it was Mekas and his friend, experimental film-maker Barbara Rubin, who introduced Warhol to Lou Reed.

His films are all, to one degree or another, impressionistic biographical diaries. Rejecting drama, suspense, storytelling and linear narrative of any kind. Mekas prefers to document what he calls "the small, intimate moments that describe daily reality without being poetic". His art is one of the jump cut and the fleeting, flickering image, which is often caught on faded colour on a Bolex 16mm camera, then woven into a bigger fabric of moments and memories.

In New York, Mekas encountered a burgeoning underground culture of artists, writers, musicians, photographers and film-makers, regularly crossing paths with the likes of Allen Ginsberg, film-maker Maya Deren, Robert Frank, John Cage and musician La Monte Young, many of whom came to his Manhattan loft for his regular film evenings.

"Virtually everything I created or helped create was done out of necessity," says Mekas. "Film Culture magazine, for instance, was born because we met and discussed films regularly, but there was no voice for us like there was in Britain, which had Sight & Sound magazine, or France, which had Cahiers du cinĂ©ma. It was the same with the screenings, which I organised simply because there were so many films that needed to be shown. And, when we started showing them, I then had to put the information out in my column in Village Voice. All of it was driven by necessity."







Wednesday, 14 November 2018

THE CINEMATIC GENIUS OF BUSTER KEATON


The brilliance of 1920s cinema is that the movies were a novelty art form, there were no rules, the norm was experimentation because there was nothing to base the art form on.
The 20's saw plenty of the experimentation in camera and editing technique, outrageous performances, increasing narrative ambition was also growing just as Buster started making movies. 

Few cinematic experiences are as joyous as watching Keaton's films with fresh eyes. His incredible films during the 1920's are revelations, filled with clever social insights and, of course an array of how-did-he-just-do-that stunt work. His screen presence remains one of cinema's most poetic: the hapless everyman whose indefatigable and reckless impulsiveness remains the source of great inspiration for contemporary viewers. The moods and emotions conveyed resonate today just as they did in the early 20th century, a testament to Keaton's keen understanding of the human experience.


Cinema geek & provocateur filmmaker Fabrizio Federico lists his Top 5 Buster Keaton movies:


1. The Navigator (1924) I loved this film so much when I was a kid, especially his miniature sized cannon that he uses on the cannibals. Two socialites get stuck on a ship and have to survive. Its priceless seeing him covered in a bed sheet thrashing about looking like a ghost, plus the films also features the first underwater sequence ever filmed, which took four weeks to film due to the early technology. Because the water was too blurry under the sea they had to go to Lake Tahoe which is famous for having crystal clear water.

2. One Week (1920) This was the first film Buster directed. Inspired by a documentary he saw about how you could purchase a house-lot and then build your own portable home in a week. I love how with Buster you never knew what was coming next, he'd trick you into feeling secure then pull the rug from under your feet - BAM!! The way the train misses his house on the track, only for the second train coming in the other direction to smash into it, must have cracked-up those 1920's audiences with it's unpredictability.

3. Sherlock Jr. (1924) This is Buster's cult movie. A dreamlike masterpiece full of early special effects and the film also works as a thesis on cinemas philosophical wisdom, of how making and watching a movie are linked. He also broke his neck on this film without even realising it until decades later. The scene where he shadows his suspect with incredible comedic timing is still one of his finest moments.
4. The Goat (1921) The gags come thick & fast in this masterpiece as Buster gets mistaken for murderer Dead Shot Dan. It's hilarious when he recognises himself in the huge mug-shot poster on the wall, his reaction is priceless, along with the clay horse falling on him, some of the humour transcends age.
Cops (1922) As his friend Fatty Arbuckle was on trial, Buster set to work on this keystone-cop's kapper which features some phenomenal on-foot chase scenes between Buster and hundreds on police extras, all chasing him down the screet, which must have been exhilarating for him to film, he was a sensational athlete. Of course he did all his own stunts which he suffered for later in life, but he was such a fast sprinter, he's like a bullet.
5. The General (1927) Based on a true story from the Civil War and filmed in Oregon.  Using real gun-powder they accidentally set fire to a forest during shooting which delayed the production. Although he was called ''The Great Stone Face'' he brings the audience into his character's pride, panic, frustration and yearning, all the while performing miraculous stunts that even Jackie Chan would envy. My fav improv bit is when he throws a piece of wood at the cannon. Between takes he would play baseball on the roof of the locomotives even knocking off his father off one of their roofs! The whole local population came from all over to watch the most expensive single shot in all the silent cinema history, the destruction of the train off the tall bridge. People even freaked out because they thought the dummy Buster put in the train drivers seat was a real person. I still cant believe how bad the film reviews were when it was originally released.           
Our Hospitality (1923) His first feature film, and also the one where he almost drowned in a wild river stunt, which they also kept in the film. You can see when Buster realises he's in trouble. His cameraman filmed the whole accident because Buster never yelled ''cut'', maybe cose he was too busy drowning. He never used scripts, ideas & gags just came to him and he'd follow through with it until he got the sequence right. Even if it meant having his stomach pumped, after the famous upside down waterfall sequence took ages to get right he'd still never give up, he was truly heroic in that sense. 

OFFICIAL WEBSITE
  


Monday, 12 November 2018

DAZED & CONFUSED - FILM TACKLES INSANE CELEBRITY 'IT' GIRLS


Filmmaker Fabrizio Federico is that rare anomaly of everything that is anti-fashion that he becomes fashion. He is culturally relevant, part of popular culture. And he speaks to the outsider, non-conformist side of the film industry and transcends cinema. His audience reaches the outside of the movie industry. They are the people and influencers shaping our landscape. He is like a man child, vulnerable yet tough. Recently featured among the best independent filmmakers of 2018, he’s very of the moment but timeless as well. Fabrizio feels like change in a good way. Lets follow him, he’ll rise as a new star with his new motion picture Teddy Bears Live Forever.


Perma-wearing his sunglasses and pink beret he is a London film brat who represents the mystery and allure of the hard-edged British style re-packaged and taken global following the movie Anarchy In The UK: The New Underground Cinema. Mixing car crash cinema sportswear and poetic too-cool-to-care louche glamour beneath his dark-ringed eye sockets. It’s a lewk, darlings.
Fabrizio is no doubt more than what meets the eye… Known for showcasing his most personal thoughts and feelings in his films, Fabrizio has also been speaking up for real-life issues. If you ask us, there’s nothing better than a rebel with a cause. Following his own path of artistic freedom.
April is a young faded ''It girl'' suffering in exile from multiple-personality disorder (brought on by a UFO Cult & Hollywood) and she decides that one of her six personalities must lose her virginity.
As April suffers bizarre flashbacks in a solitary room, sleepwalking, telephoning rent boys, listening to The Carpenters and terrorising her old guardian with her untamed sex appeal. She ultimately set's out to become a modern saint.
''I made the film on intuition and a sensation to focus on some powerful messages (trauma, anti-establishment, false idolatry, existential angst and spirituality) wrapped up in an isolated feline martyr quality.
The main character April is fighting to regain a state of grace that she lost as an ''It girl'' living in a superficial society obsessed with illusion while working in Hollywood. April is trying to penetrate the essence of her problems by being brave, screaming & articulating her pain through the film. She's trying to release the poisoned fragrance of her trauma. She's deprogramming her self by losing her mind.
In the beginning of the movie we're shown a glimpse into her former ''It girl'' pop-culture life, at the complete absolute zenith of her fame, which is full of tacky excitement, flashes, games, disciples, vibrations and action.
But then the film moves to the aftermath of all that, and to her current isolated life in London after rejecting her followers. But now she is battling her six personalities, so in a way she's leading six different realities and levels of consciousness. Each personality is a different level of consciousness, but music is her true prayer. She listens to The Carpenters while in exile, because she identifies with women who suffered, like Karen Carpenter, Judy Garland, Marilyn Monroe etc... but she also enjoys hanging herself by visualising her suicide.
The film is also an insight into gurus, and how they deal with their followers problems, whether they are suffering from family or social suffering. The movies about spiritual terms instead of adolescent terms.

Tuesday, 6 November 2018

Interview with filmmaker Caster Fagan

Still from the motion picture 'Subject A Male'

What gave you the idea to make this film? 
From an early age, and as I get older, I have been to a variety of doctors and medical professionals. As many know, medical buildings and doctors’ offices have a plethora of waiting rooms. Sometimes, while waiting in these rooms alone, you get the feeling that you have been forgotten. In my case, my mind flips through countless scenarios of why I am alone in this room. One of these happens to be the premise for “Subject ‘A’ Male” (S.A.M.). 

How did the films shoot go, what was it like working with the cast? 
Filming has been great! I have been of several sets before, but this is the first time that I have written a feature. So, to be involved in the technical aspects of filming as well as the creative, it is truly an amazing learning experience. The cast is wonderful. The acting chops are more than impressive. They have really “become” the characters, giving them so much life. I am blown away by their interpretation. The crew is also incredible. I am truly blessed to be working with all those involved. 

Did anything weird happen during production? 
My God! Did it ever… all funny though. The set construction was an experience. We used a very limited space in a warehouse on Long Island for the main facility filming. The set was fluid in the sense that we had to move walls around and arrange them to match the floor plan for all the shots — reusing walls for the different “rooms.” At one point, we were trying to add a partial drop ceiling in the main room. The only problem was that the walls were not exact, and the tiles fell numerous times before we decided to screw, wire, tape and wrap… let’s just say we used ten screws in place of the normal one on each piece. Not only that, but there were a row of windows on the very top of the 20 foot warehouse east and west walls which led to drastically different lighting issues from morning to sunset. We used tarps, wood, green board, anything we could stack to prevent shadows. Perhaps the funniest and most frustrating circumstance was the day job work never ceased while we were filming. The other half of the warehouse had constant truck noise, foot traffic, loud sounds, you name it! Not to mention, we were right on the service road of the L.I.E. But, we did manage to get great sound regardless, even though we had to stop on several occasions because of a toilet flush or truck horn. 

What will be your next project? 
At the conclusion of this film (2019), we (same crew, different cast) jump right into the next feature I have written. It is called “Breathe Me In” and is a parallel story to “Subject ‘A’ Male” (S.A.M.)… another surreal, psychological thriller. My personal goal is to take this to a trilogy of parallel stories, connected without being sequels or prequels, etc. 

Who are some of your favourite filmmakers? 
I would have to say that my favourite filmmakers would be: Rian Johnson — loved “Brick” Vincenzo Natali — “Cube” is one of my favs Paul Mones — mainly for “The Beat”

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Tuesday, 30 October 2018

THE LONG AND WINDING ROAD FROM PSYCHOTHERAPIST TO SINGLE MOM TO FEMALE EMPOWERMENT ADVOCATE TO AWARD WINNING FILMMAKER FOR SMALL TOWN GIRL



DANBURY, CT, – Back in 1992, Stephanie C. Lyons was in her second year of grad school studying psychology. Little did she realise that 26 years later she would be working on what would be hailed as the “cult classic of all time” (even though virtually no one has seen it yet) – The History of Everything Circa 1993 to the Present: Formerly Known as Kissy Cousins, Monster Babies and Morphing Elvis – as co-producer, co-director, and co-writer.

As Robert Frost famously said, “Two roads diverged…” only there were more than a few twists and turns for Ms. Lyons. 
Fast forward from her work as a psychotherapist and later the director of a women’s work release program, to marriage, four children (and a divorce), to living for an extended period with her parents. Like J.K. Rowling, at the time, she utilised one of her best skills – writing -- and became a freelance journalist and reporter so she could be home to raise her children.

During a chance newspaper assignment, she had the opportunity to meet her soulmate, lawyer and filmmaker Wayne J. Keeley, who was a bit older than Stephanie and had a stockpile of scripts that had never been shopped, as well as a 26-year-old unfinished film – Kissy Cousins, Monster Babies and Morphing Elvis – that had been collecting dust on a shelf. The two found they had more in common than just like-minded visions of life. They began working together almost immediately on multiple entertainment projects. Their work relationship eventually led to a romantic one – and now they’re touted as the “Dynamic Duo.”



Since they have been together, Stephanie and Wayne have written, produced, and directed four Off-Off Broadway plays, produced and directed an Emmy-nominated public service campaign, co-written two novels, created the highly popular blog Pillow Talking, which focuses on reviews of theatre and film, and last, but not least, updated and retooled the 26-year-old film Kissy Cousins, Monster Babies and Morphing Elvis. In fact, the film has just received its 90th film festival laurel including THE STRAIGHT JACKET GUERRILLA FILM FESTIVAL.

But wait. There’s more! Stephanie has now branched off into independent screenwriting and created a horror script which focuses on female empowerment titled See Evil. While the screenplay is in the horror/thriller genre, it also has an LGBTQ focus (she and her husband are ardent advocates and supporters). It involves married female protagonists who must fight reapers that threaten their loved ones including their unborn child. “I believe that See Evil falls squarely within the sweet spot of films like Get Out – which are both horrific and socially relevant,” says Mr. Keeley, her multiple-award winning filmmaker husband. “I just hope she hires me in some capacity when it gets rolling!”

At present, See Evil is hot off the press and just received its first Official Selection laurel in the Diabolical Horror Film Festival. For certain, this genre-satisfying tale will be the one to watch!


THE NEW REBEL VOICE OF CINEMA


Filmmaker Fabrizio Federico is that rare anomaly of everything that is anti-fashion that he becomes fashion. He is culturally relevant, part of popular culture. And he speaks to the outsider, non-conformist side of the film industry and transcends cinema. His audience reaches the outside of the movie industry. They are the people and influencers shaping our landscape. 
He is like a man child, vulnerable yet tough. Recently featured among the best independent filmmakers of 2018, he’s very of the moment but timeless as well. Fabrizio feels like change in a good way. Lets follow him, he’ll rise as a new star with his new motion picture Teddy Bears Live Forever


Perma-wearing his sunglasses and pink beret he is a London film brat who represents the mystery and allure of the hard-edged British style re-packaged and taken global following the movie Anarchy In The UK: The New Underground Cinema. Mixing car crash cinema sportswear and poetic too-cool-to-care louche glamour beneath his dark-ringed eye sockets. It’s a lewk, darlings.

Fabrizio is no doubt more than what meets the eye… Known for showcasing his most personal thoughts and feelings in his films, Fabrizio has also been speaking up for real-life issues. If you ask us, there’s nothing better than a rebel with a cause. Following his own path of artistic freedom.



Wednesday, 24 October 2018

PSYCHOCANDY - TOP 5 Inspiring Films About Madness

Movies about madness, psychosis & mental breakdowns go as far back as the 1920's as a thematic concern in cinema. Each director approaches insanity with gusto on screen, it's possibilities of dramatic tension are limitless, and to celebrate another cinematic link in this tradition here are underground filmmaker Fabrizio Federico's Top 5 inspirations which brought to life his new berserk film 'Teddy Bears Live Forever'.  OFFICIAL WEBSITE



Wednesday, 19 September 2018

THE CINEMATIC MISADVENTURES OF ED WOOD


Ed Wood was the irrepressible director of some of the tawdriest Z-grade science-fiction and horror films of the 1950s, a director who never let his tiny budgets get in the way of pursuing his vision. Films such as Bride of the Monster (1955) and Plan 9 from Outer Space (1959) are littered with cardboard spaceships, rubber monster suits, and incongruous stock footage. Here we talk with Ed Wood aficionado Bob Blackburn as he discusses the charismatic, cross-dressing auteur, who donned his beloved angora sweaters and enrapted in a eureka moment of inspiration, eyes bright with enthusiasm above his pencil-thin moustache.

*How did you come to find out about Ed Wood?
Basically I went to an Ed Wood film festival here in Hollywood in the summer of 1992, attached is the flyer for that event, while watching the BBC doc, I saw an interview with Kathy Wood, and I realized that I thought she was a lady who lived in my apt. building, turns out she did, after I learned that Tim Burton was going to make a film about Ed I approached her and asked her if she knew about it, no she didn't I learned a bit more it, and eventually I helped her find an entertainment lawyer, long story short we became friends, she passed away in 2006 and I am now one of two of her heirs, from meeting and befriending her I became more immersed in the world of Ed as she told me many stories over the course of our friendship, some I relate in the foreword to "Blood Splatters Quickly" a book of some of Ed's short fiction, I collected, edited and helped get published a few years ago, I have another publisher for a second volume called "Angora Fever..." which should come out later this year. I started the Ed Wood FB group, to gather like minded folks who have and share an interest in Ed's works, his personal life, family & friends etc.

*What was your first reaction after watching an Ed Wood film?
I was charmed watching his films, they never fail to fascinate and mystify me

*How do you think Ed influenced modern indie filmmakers?
I am not a filmmaker so I really don't know if he's really had that much of a direct influence on modern day film makers, I know folks who make "bad" movies on purpose, don't understand Ed at all, he never set out to make a bad film, as Kathy said many times, he had to struggle to make the money to follow his passion, and IF he would have had a real film budget who knows how good or "bad" his films might  have been, but in would hazard a guess he would be among a long list of long ago forgotten filmmakers.

*In what ways have you been involved in Ed Wood's legacy?
I have tried to keep Ed's legacy alive by getting his short fiction published, the Estate of Kathy Wood and the complications of Ed's works, copyrights etc. is a tangled mess, would take too long to try & explain, but I do my best to keep his flame alive.

Ed Wood has also been an inspiration on Lo-Fi filmmaker Fabrizio Federico ''I love the way he shot his films in a state of chaos, without any permits, just this total sense of adventure and DIY energy, how he cast non-actors and his friends in his movies. In a way he invented cult cinema.'' 

Fabrizio Federico - Website



Friday, 14 September 2018

THE STORY OF: Teddy Bears Live Forever (2019) - Interview with filmmaker Fabrizio Federico



April is a young faded ''It girl'' suffering in exile from multiple-personality disorder (brought on by a UFO Cult & Hollywood) and she decides that one of her six personalities must lose her virginity. 
As April suffers bizarre flashbacks in a solitary room, sleepwalking, telephoning rent boys, listening to The Carpenters and terrorising her old guardian with her untamed sex appeal. She ultimately set's out to become a modern saint.

''I made the film on intuition and a sensation to focus on some powerful messages (trauma, anti-establishment, false idolatry, existential angst and spirituality) wrapped up in an isolated feline martyr quality. 

The main character April is fighting to regain a state of grace that she lost as an ''It girl''  living in a superficial society obsessed with illusion while working in Hollywood. April is trying to penetrate the essence of her problems by being brave, screaming & articulating her pain through the film. She's trying to release the poisoned fragrance of her trauma. She's deprogramming her self by losing her mind. 

In the beginning of the movie we're shown a glimpse into her former ''It girl'' pop-culture life, at the complete absolute zenith of her fame, which is full of tacky excitement, flashes, games, disciples, vibrations and action. 

But then the film moves to the aftermath of all that, and to her current isolated life in London after rejecting her followers. But now she is battling her six personalities, so in a way she's leading six different realities and levels of consciousness. Each personality is a different level of consciousness, but music is her true prayer. She listens to The Carpenters while in exile, because she identifies with women who suffered, like Karen Carpenter, Judy Garland, Marilyn Monroe etc... but she also enjoys hanging herself by visualising her suicide. 
The film is also an insight into gurus, and how they deal with their followers problems, whether they are suffering from family or social suffering. The movies about spiritual terms instead of adolescent terms. 



So while she's living out Hollywood, April get's mixed up with this UFO cult, has an outer body experience and is raped by the cult. After this trauma and because she's already mixed-up with this narcissism of her glamour lifestyle, it finally turns her into a stretcher case. In the film we watch her fighting to win back her sanity. 
She constructs this mission to cure the most evil of her multiple-personalities, to lose her virginity and to feel touch, which gives her a fresh enthusiasm and a existential mission; the glorification to start communicating again.

In general terms, she is coming out of a isolated fog and is looking for a universal consciousness. This girls story actually represents the whole elemental goal of humanity. 

Feeling lost and sending signals into outer space, maybe that's why she joined a UFO cult to begin with. But she's still looking for an atomic attraction, or a spiritual push to come and save her. Dealing with six personalities will push anyone's sense's to the limit, but because she's in self-imposed isolation she cant really receive life's true miracle cure: human touch. 
Touch is the sparkling combination of feeling all of your senses all at once. So she decides to recapture her salvation by losing the virginity of the most evil, of all her multiple personalities, called Sam.

Sam is a mythological anti-hero personality, a complete freak who suck's on her bloody tampons, wears wigs and sexually terrorises her old guardian that she's living with. But in many ways April is sacrificing her sanity in order to purify her soul from Sam's sinister presence. In order to become a divine being again and to grow.


OFFICIAL WEBSITE






Tuesday, 11 September 2018

REMEMBERING FABRIZIO FEDERICO - THE SELF DESTRUCTIVE FILMMAKER SABOTEUR WHO DID IT ALL WRONG IN THE RIGHT WAY

The cult filmmaker's newest film Teddy Bears Live Forever is being released in 2019
There’s never been a filmmaker like Fabrizio Federico. Chances are, there won’t be again. Not only is there an argument for this Brit being the 2000's lost movie-maker, there’s also the debate of him being the filmmaker that killed off the idea of 20th century cinema. As he explains it ''There is a new type of filmmaker that has been reborn and has replaced the traditional filmmaker from the 20th century, more bipartisan. I am a DJ Director, my passion is to glue video into a collage of vision, concentrating on personalities, mixing the styles of MTV, the News & Youtube vlog filmmaking together ''. His newest film is about a faded ''It girl'' suffering from schizophrenia due to an alien abduction and decides that one of her personalities must lose her virginity, even though she's already lost it.

Self-sabotage

That Fabrizio Federico is a star-shaped jigsaw piece in a square hole should have been clear from the off ever since surviving a house fire as a child. On the eve of the release of his feature film debut 'Black Biscuit' in 2011 he described making the film as being like ''Russian roulette”. He'd originally planned to make the film in North Korea but was denied a visa. He ended up filming in Nottingham with a Greek pimp and falling out of a tree and breaking his foot. Shooting the movie on toy Fisher-Price camera's and mobile phones, his apartment became a haven for the street superstars that he would meet on the streets and cast in his film, including a ping-pong champion, a dominatrix and Big Issue magazine sellers. Somehow he managed to re-finish the film after his computer exploded on the day of Michael Jackson's death.

Early perfection

This week the filmmaker announced that his next movie will be released in 2019. There’s the odd lollop of early Harmony Korine. The groove of Xavier Dolan. The cut and paste ingenuity of Jean Luc Godard. Arguably it’s stranger than any of his previous releases. He is the bedsit Lars Von Trier. Federico represents the filmmaker that for years chewed off his own limbs, simultaneously while editing footage blindfolded, listening to exorcisms on a diet of weed and yogurt, all on a micro-budget.

Raised on punk, emboldened by hip-hop, dance, free to be whatever he wanted – used to the ‘push the envelope, make magic happen, give it away for free’ ideal. On the eve of an era that saw YouTube filmmakers convert their vision into a world wide audience. But Federico delivered cinema folly in spades.




Doggedness, dadaism & drugs

In the beginning, he only screened his films at week-day film clubs, or left copies of his homemade DVD's on tables at bars and gigs. Then after his film 'Pregnant' screened in Essex and caused a riot his films were blacklisted from theatres, starting with a run at the Genesis cinema being cancelled and. Subsequently he has developed a large following in Mexico. 
Everything Federico did was tangential. When Empire magazine requested him for an interview, he agreed only on the condition if he would be asked the same questions as put to Stanley Kubrick during the making of The Shining. When he was invited at the Raindance Film Festival he arrived on crutches wearing a T-shirt that read, ‘If assholes could fly, this place would be an airport’. He refused to appear on children’s television. He claimed that YouTube is more popular then Jesus.
Such contrariness and blind scepticism felt genuinely exciting in the film industry that had turned dull.
He pulled karate moves and danced like a Native American shaman. It was presumed he liked drugs. Maybe. Maybe not. “LSD isn't a drug” he said confusingly, but he claiming it cured him from sleepwalking. 
Subsequently he went to the Bermuda triangle to get married, and learnt about voodoo and mysticism. Later also recording the soundtrack to his film 'Loon' at Aleister Crowley's abandoned Boleskine House, creating Zodiac Killer art, and introducing his cinema alter ego called Jett Hollywood ''a filmmaker from Mars''. After two films he released a suicide note which resulted in a missing persons investigation when the note went viral. 




Smells Like Teen Spirit

Not that he ever thought he was weird. “filmmakers like me should be the norm” said Federico recently. “I think it’s weird that very average, banal films are the norm, Im looking for cinematic nirvana”.
Official Website