Tuesday, 16 January 2018

*GONZO CINEMA* THE STORY OF 'LOON' - ''IT'S A GLORIOUS UNMADE BED''


Independent films are the life blood of the film industry, they have the wildest ideas and set the trends. The auteurs; independent because they cannot stand to make the films they truly want within a system they despise. 
They live by their own vision and are stubborn, driven, talented, crafty, observant and tender all at the same time.

Taking risks and inventing new characters that are from the margins of society has never been Hollywood's main cultural demographic. Budget limitations mean nothing to filmmakers like Fabrizio Federico, hoodwinking is part of the game, and they are driven to tell their negative pick-up fables, ''I was stabbed with a fork while filming but I was so in the zone that I didnt feel a thing''.

Fabrizio has a desirable decadence mixed with an artistic atmosphere. His hippie, freaky teenage upbringing of moving countries, which impacted his gift of the gab and a sense of adventurousness. ''When I was a kid I would get all my village friends to pretend to be the Ex-President bank robbers from the movie Point Break, I was Ronald Reagan. That's when I became a filmmaker''.
Federico appears to have two quite distinct personalities co-existing (the dysfunctional filmmaker and the blissed-out stoner) his bohemian lifestyle puts him at odd's with authority figures ''I watched a lot of surfer movies and street films as a teenager like Midnight Cowboy, Panic In Needle Nose Park, Another Day in Paradise and I always rooted for the bad guys''.



Some big themes come up in Federico's work such as injustice, soul sacrifice, addiction and strangelove.  He see's underground and experimental cinema as a force to be appreciated by a bigger international mainstream audience. ''I like the idea of treating the audience to a chaotic, compelling aesthetic, to scramble their brains. I want to show them an uncomfortable time, I feel they can take it. They are not as innocent as they look''. 

Loon has a random mix of stoned, catatonic moments, mixed with subliminal Kubrick messages, which then switch to troubled intimate teenage situations in bedrooms, somewhere their parents cant hear them, ''the film is just a glorious unmade bed.''
Most importantly the film is fun and trashy but intriguing in a deeper way, full of nonlinear narlyness. At the centre lies the films Dismaland pop-culture, main character Charlie Sheen is a petty thief, tied in a folie a deux relationship with his sinister older cousin Georgia. Suddenly his chaotic life style reaches a climax. 

Authenticity of expression is a non-actors main virtuosity, meaning they are in the NOW, you can call it Zen filmmaking, they dont care about pretending to be someone else, there's no strings attached and they definitely dont give a fuck about the directors vision. But they are self-serving to express themselves, knowing that this is the only movie they will ever be in. Sometimes they use real drugs on camera to get in touch with their anxieties and phobias, and the effect is so voyeuristic it's uncomfortable viewing. 
Loon is his 3rd feature film in a body of work that is strangely cohesive and definite for such a new artist. His identity is so embossed boldly onto each film that it feels less like something he created and more like an extension of himself.

In art-house films, ambiguity and uneasiness is much more involved on a personal level, 
The big plus from the filmmakers point of view is that he has completed the movie he dreamed of and since it was zero-budget if the film bombs financially it doesn't matter.
It's a long list of filmmakers living the cinema dream this way, film outlaws such as Jim Jarmusch, Larry Clark, John Cassevetes, Todd Haynes, Abel Ferrara, Alex Holdridge and all the way to the present day. 
Loon is an irrational movie, and a natural extension to this cannon of filmmaking.

LOON - Released on Halloween 2017
OFFICIAL WEBSITE

Sunday, 14 January 2018

INTERVIEW with Filmmaker Jason Wright


*You've been very productive this past year, what give's you the drive on your projects? I have always been a huge fan of horror. I am luckily to have such a dedicated team of creative people that help drive my ideas and vision.
*Tell us where the inspiration for Torture came from? Torture has been in the making for over 4 years and is like Hostel vs Saw. We have had a few scriptwriters involved in this project to refine and make this a great film. As all of our films, it started out as a story not more than 30 pages and then with the help of the team we developed it into a feature film.
*Who was the first filmmaker to blow your mind? That is a great question and I would have to say George A. Romero as his delivery of zombie films are some of the best of all time. When I watched them as a young man, they always seemed to have that eerie effect so making the experience more immersive.
*What was the production like on both films? Torture was filmed over 3 years so as our first feature film it took a long of time and planning but will so much help and support it is now in post-production and we are looking forward to releasing a trailer soon. Acid Pit Stop was out second feature film, which was filming under 4 weeks so completely different in its setup and production process. Both productions have their pros and cons in terms of how they were completed but at the end of the day, they are both great films so watch out for them being released soon.
*Where did you find your cast, did anyone get hurt during the making? We have a few casting crew including myself so each role was carefully thought about before we selective cast. As we are a great believer in health and safety, no one got hurt on either film set.
*How have audiences been reacting toward Torture? As this is not released this would be very hard to answer. What I can say it that we did release an essence trailer a while ago and we have had lots of great comments and emails about that and wanting to know when the film is being released J So all positive J
*When will Acid Pit be released and what’s the premise? We are looking to get ACID PIT STOP released in 2018 so fingers crossed on that. APS is a zombie comedy that has a unique twist to it J So I don’t want to spoil the fun so you will have to wait for the trailer to be released.
*What real life serial killer is the villain in Torture based on? It is not based on any real life killer as such but it is a great film that should keet you guessing.
*Whats the weirdest story you can tell us from your career as a filmmaker? As a filmmaker you always have lots of weird stories come across your desk so to speak but the we have just finished a NEW novel called Blood Harvest which I believe is for sure the weirdest and most goriest project we have been involved in so far J
*What was the first horror film you saw as a kid? That is easy as the first horror film I saw, as a young man was The Evil Dead J
*Where was Torture filmed? Torture has taken a long time to film as is has many locations in the film. We did a lot of filming on a friend’s farm in West Sussex and some of the key news scenes in Southend on Sea.
*Did any of your cast freak out during filming? You will always get one or two cast or crew that find the filming hard on extreme films like Torture. At the end of the day it is just a film and not real so everyone takes it for what it is but is doesn’t stop a few screaming J More details on this kind of thing will be revealed when the film is released and we are at the film festivals J
*What was the editing process like? Both films are currently in post-production which is a long process but where the magic happens. All I can say is that it is going well and we are on track J
*Whats next for you in 2018? Well we have a few things we can announce and confirm. We are filming next month on ZOMBIE WARS, which is a great anthology feature film and a must for zombie fans. We are in pre-production for another feature film called Mannequin, which is due to start filming this year, and we can announce that ZOMBIKINI is currently in script but will be in pre-production either 2018 or 2019.
 
For another information visit www.silent-studios.co.uk and other links are
 
 
 
 
 


Friday, 5 January 2018

FILMMAKER OF THE MONTH - FABRIZIO FEDERICO


                                                   

Monday, 11 December 2017

*GONZO CINEMA* THE STORY OF 'LOON' - ''IT'S A GLORIOUS UNMADE BED''


Independent films are the life blood of the film industry, they have the wildest ideas and set the trends. The auteurs; independent because they cannot stand to make the films they truly want within a system they despise. 
They live by their own vision and are stubborn, driven, talented, crafty, observant and tender all at the same time.

Taking risks and inventing new characters that are from the margins of society has never been Hollywood's main cultural demographic. Budget limitations mean nothing to filmmakers like Fabrizio Federico, hoodwinking is part of the game, and they are driven to tell their negative pick-up fables, ''I was stabbed with a fork while filming but I was so in the zone that I didnt feel a thing''.

Fabrizio has a desirable decadence mixed with an artistic atmosphere. His hippie, freaky teenage upbringing of moving countries, which impacted his gift of the gab and a sense of adventurousness. ''When I was a kid I would get all my village friends to pretend to be the Ex-President bank robbers from the movie Point Break, I was Ronald Reagan. That's when I became a filmmaker''.
Federico appears to have two quite distinct personalities co-existing (the dysfunctional filmmaker and the blissed-out stoner) his bohemian lifestyle puts him at odd's with authority figures ''I watched a lot of surfer movies and street films as a teenager like Midnight Cowboy, Panic In Needle Nose Park, Another Day in Paradise and I always rooted for the bad guys''.



Some big themes come up in Federico's work such as injustice, soul sacrifice, addiction and strangelove.  He see's underground and experimental cinema as a force to be appreciated by a bigger international mainstream audience. ''I like the idea of treating the audience to a chaotic, compelling aesthetic, to scramble their brains. I want to show them an uncomfortable time, I feel they can take it. They are not as innocent as they look''. 

Loon has a random mix of stoned, catatonic moments, mixed with subliminal Kubrick messages, which then switch to troubled intimate teenage situations in bedrooms, somewhere their parents cant hear them.
Most importantly the film is fun and trashy but intriguing in a deeper way, full of nonlinear narlyness. At the centre lies the films Dismaland pop-culture, main character Charlie Sheen is a petty thief, tied in a folie a deux relationship with his sinister older cousin Georgia. Suddenly his chaotic life style reaches a climax. 

Authenticity of expression is a non-actors main virtuosity, meaning they are in the NOW. 
They dont care about pretending to be someone else, there's no strings attached and they definitely dont give a fuck about the directors vision. But they are self-serving to express themselves, knowing that this is the only movie they will ever be in. Sometimes they use real drugs on camera to get in touch with their anxieties and phobias, and the effect is so voyeuristic it's uncomfortable viewing. 
Loon is his 3rd feature film in a body of work that is strangely cohesive and definite for such a new artist. His identity is so embossed boldly onto each film that it feels less like something he created and more like an extension of himself.

In art-house films, ambiguity and uneasiness is much more involved on a personal level, 
The big plus from the filmmakers point of view is that he has completed the movie he dreamed of and since it was zero-budget if the film bombs financially it doesn't matter.
It's a long list of filmmakers living the cinema dream this way, film outlaws such as Jim Jarmusch, Larry Clark, John Cassevetes, Todd Haynes, Abel Ferrara, Alex Holdridge and all the way to the present day. 
An irrational movie like Federico's newest film Loon is an extension to this cannon of cinema making.

LOON - Released on Halloween 2017
OFFICIAL WEBSITE

Friday, 8 December 2017

CULT OF PERSONALITY - THE STORY OF 'LOON'


Independent films are the life blood of the film industry, they have the wildest ideas and set the trends. The auteurs; independent because they cannot stand to make the films they truly want within a system they despise. 
They live by their own vision and are stubborn, driven, talented, crafty, observant and tender all at the same time.

Taking risks and inventing new characters that are from the margins of society has never been Hollywood's main cultural demographic. Budget limitations mean nothing to filmmakers like Fabrizio Federico, hoodwinking is part of the game, and they are driven to tell their negative pick-up's fables, ''I was stabbed with a fork while filming but I was so in the zone that I didnt feel it''.

Fabrizio has a desirable decadence mixed with an artistic atmosphere. His hippie, freaky teenage upbringing of moving countries, which impacted his gift of the gab and a sense of adventurousness. ''When I was little I would get all my village friends to pretend to be the ex-president bank robbers from the movie Point Break, I was Ronald Regan. That was the start of me as a filmmaker''.
Federico appears to have two quite distinct personalities co-existing (the dysfunctional filmmaker and the blissed-out stoner) his bohemian lifestyle puts him at odd's with authority figures ''I watched a lot of surfer movies and street films as a teenager like Midnight Cowboy, Panic In Needle Nose Park, Another Day in Paradise and I always rooted for the bad guys''.

Some big themes come up in Federico's work such as injustice, soul sacrifice, addiction and strangelove.  He see's underground and experimental cinema as a force to be appreciated by a bigger international mainstream audience. ''I like the idea of treating the audience to a chaotic, compelling aesthetic, to scramble their brains. I want to show them an uncomfortable time, I feel they can take it. They are not as innocent as they look''. 

Loon has a random mix of stoned, catatonic moments, which then switch to wild troubled intimate teenage situations in bedrooms, so their parents cant hear them.
Most importantly the film is fun and trashy but intriguing in a deeper way, full of nonlinear narlyness. At the centre lies the films Dismaland pop-culture, main character Charlie Sheen is a petty thief, tied in a folie a deux relationship with his sinister older cousin Georgia. Suddenly his chaotic life style reaches a climax. 


Authenticity of expression is a non-actors main virtuosity, meaning they are in the NOW. 
They dont care about pretending to be someone else, there's no strings attached and they definitely dont give a fuck about the directors vision. But they are self-serving to express themselves, knowing that this is the only movie they will ever be in. Sometimes they use real drugs on camera to get in touch with their anxieties and phobias, and the effect is so voyeuristic it's uncomfortable viewing. 
In art-house films, ambiguity and uneasiness is much more involved on a personal level, 
The big plus from the filmmakers point of view is that he has completed the movie he dreamed of and since it was zero-budget if the film bombs financially it doesn't matter.
It's a long list of filmmakers living the cinema dream this way, film outlaws such as Jim Jarmusch, Larry Clark, John Cassevetes, Todd Haynes, Abel Ferrara, Alex Holdridge and all the way to the present day. 
An irrational movie like Federico's newest film Loon is an extension to this cannon of cinema making.

Loon was released on Halloween 2017
OFFICIAL WEBSITE








Tuesday, 28 November 2017

Syd Barrett's First Trip

Syd Barrett's First Trip
According to the filmmaker, Nigel Lesmoir-Gordon, the film “just happened…. It is an unselfconscious film. It was not planned.” Of the ’66 footage, shot by his wife Jenny, he writes on the film’s IMDB page:
''I shot this film of Syd on a visit from film school in London to my hometown, Cambridge. We were on the Gog Magog hills with a bunch of friends. David Gale is there along with Andrew Rawlinson, Russell Page, Lucy Pryor and my wife, Jenny. She's the one in the yellow mac talking to the tree. The mushroom images are iconic and will last forever. It is an unselfconscious film. It was not planned. It just happened. The guy on the balcony is me at 101 Cormwell Road, London SW7. This footage was shot by Jenny. When David Gale wrote about 101 in The Independent he recalled: As the 60s began to generate heat, I found myself running with a fast crowd. I had moved into a flat near the Royal College of Art. I shared the flat with some close friends from Cambridge, including Syd Barrett, who was busy becoming a rock star with Pink Floyd. A few hundred yards down the street at 101 Cromwell Road, our preternaturally cool friend Nigel was running the hipster equivalent of an arty salon. Between our place and his, there passed the cream of London alternative society - poets, painters, film-makers, charlatans, activists, bores and self-styled visionaries. It was a good time for name-dropping: how could I forget the time at Nigels when I came across Allen Ginsberg asleep on a divan with a tiny white kitten on his bare chest? And wasn't that Mick Jagger visible through the fumes? Look, there's Nigel's postcard from William Burroughs, who looks forward to meeting him when next he visits London! The other material is of the band outside EMI after their contract signing. It's raw, unedited footage and stunning even so. It is silent but many people have subsequently put music to it on their youtube an google postings. Good luck to them.''
It was the late summer of 1966 when Syd first tripped on magic mushrooms while film student friend Nigel Gordon captured the moment on standard 8mm film. Even before his days in Pink Floyd, Syd had that star quality. It's fair to say that life would never be the same after that day out at the Gog Magog Hills outside Cambridge. 
These are the characters in Syd’s entourage in this “raw, unedited footage,” which was originally silent, though many people have added music such as the new age-y ambient soundscape in the version above. I happen to think it’s a nice complement, but if you find it intrusive, turn the volume off. The images, as the filmmaker admits, are still “stunning.”
Every musical era has its cautionary tales, and its visionaries. The sixties produced its share of them all, but also a handful of brilliant misfits who were inseparably both, all of them psychedelic pioneers. Skip Spence, for example—the brilliant founding member of Jefferson Airplane, then Moby Grape, who effectively ended his career attacking his bandmates with a fire axe. Then of course, there’s the founding singer/songwriter of Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett, whose decline found him onstage, almost catatonic, with a can of Brylcreem and a crushed bottle of pills called Mandrax dripping down his face. When Barrett passed away in 2006, most of the reaction—after the shock of learning he’d still been alive—centered on the sequence of psychotic breakdowns during 1967 that would leave Barrett changed forever. Spence and several other, more obscure figures, had similarly dramatic, and permanent, shifts in consciousness, and of all of them the same question gets asked: was it the drugs?
Of course we’re asking if the drugs created the mental illnesses or just exacerbated the inevitable, but we’re also asking if the drugs created the music. It’s a worthwhile, if somewhat uncomfortable, inquiry that’s probably impossible to answer. But I must admit, it’s difficult to imagine the first incarnation of Pink Floyd without Barrett’s heavy experimentation. The short film above implies a direct connection and takes us to Syd’s psychedelic inception. Simply titled Syd Barrett’s First Trip, the first part of the film, “Gog Magog Hills,” follows a clean-cut Barrett and several companions as they frolic in a field on LSD. As you probably gathered, it’s his first time. Then the film cuts abruptly to “Abbey Road Studios,” to footage documenting Pink Floyd in London after having just signed their first contract with EMI in 1967. It’s the beginning of the end for Barrett’s career and mental health, but the inauguration of the band as mass-market phenomenon.
Pink Floyd 1967



Tuesday, 14 November 2017

CHAOTIC CINEMA - 'LOON' A CURSED MASTERPIECE [WATCH FREE]


When the director decides to use as the soundtrack to his new film an album recorded at the cursed Boleskine house, previously owned by the notorious magician Aleister Crowley and then Led Zeppelin's virtuoso guitarist Jimmy Page, you know that the sweet sinful life is on the horizon.

We'll have to wait and see how the film Loon divides audiences, and what intellectual debates will materialise over the films topics on family, obsession, abuse, racism, homophobia and Brexit. But what this experimental chaotic tale is really designed to show is a sick twisted family saga that could be happening right next door to you - they could even be your very own neighbour.

Ladies and gentlemen meet the Sheen family.

A spectacle machine is never a good neighbour. Their teenage son Charlie is both goofy and violent, but his racist/homophobic perspective is driven by his twin obsession of becoming a superstar drummer like his idol Keith Moon, which is matched by his uncontrolled passion for his batshit crazy but sensuous older cousin, Georgia. 

The director Fabrizio Federico is very quiet but also very funny and slightly unusual, the whole nutcase thing came from him smoking pot because he didnt really have a temper before that. ''I just say how things make me feel, I hate being let down and I lose it sometimes, other then that Im happy to chill and see what happens.''
He's a very ambitious person and see's underground & experimental cinema being appreciated by a much younger international audience. ''Im giving the audience the benefit of the doubt, Im guessing if you're into my films your a bit wild to begin with'', ''a family can be like a war zone, only these characters dont care about landing on a mine.''



Getting that buzz-film reputation, Fabrizio is as much an intriguing character as his films, with a dark depth to them concerning shamanism, reincarnation, sex and addiction, they also have that pop-culture pulse beat that early Tarantino and Korine bring to cinema. That vivid film geek quality, except instead of being into genre films he's into cinematic anarchy.

Folie à deux (/fɒˈli ə ˈdu)  French for "madness of two"
  • Bonnie & Clyde
  • Ian Brady & Myra Hindley
  • Sid & Nancy
  • Kurt & Courtney
  • Charles Starkweather & Carol Ann Fugate

History is littered with similar couples, egging the other partner on to see how far the other will go.

filmmaker Fabrizio Federico